November 2018 Archives

What happens to debt when someone dies?

When you live in New York and someone gives you the responsibility of handling his or her affairs after he or she passes, you will need to take certain steps to do so while you manage your loved one’s estate. This might include paying off debts, making distributions to beneficiaries and so on, but what happens when the person who dies leaves considerable debt behind?

5 mistakes estate executors must avoid

As the executor of an estate, you're staffed with more responsibilities than you probably realize. By taking a high level overview of the situation early on, you'll soon understand what you're up against and how to move through the process in an efficient manner.

How guardianships and conservatorships differ

As a resident of New York who is watching your parents age, you may have firsthand knowledge of just how difficult it can be to do so. Watching your parents grow older can prove even more difficult when one of them starts suffering physical or mental hardships, as some conditions can make it increasingly tough for your parents to make sound decisions and otherwise care for themselves. At the law office of Joseph A. Ledwidge, P.C., we are familiar with the types of circumstances that may lead you to consider a guardianship or conservatorship over an aging parent or other loved one. We have helped many clients facing similar situations find long-term solutions that meet their needs.

Coordinating a long-term care plan that people understand

Long-term care planning is not generally a topic that people in New York are itching to discuss with their loved ones. Often, the people who will need it the soonest, may not recognize how critical planning ahead actually is. They may also neglect to clearly define their expectations to those who they want to participate in their care. Likewise, the people listed in another person's long-term care plan may have an inaccurate understanding of their responsibilities or be unfamiliar with where to find critical documents that disclose vital information. 

How is a power of attorney different from a living will?

New York estate planning experts often recommend that you establish both a power of attorney and a living will. The two documents are similar to one another in that they both pertain to end-of-life issues and how your health care will proceed in the event that you become incapacitated and are unable to make such decisions for yourself. 

Joseph A. Ledwidge, P.C.
17026 Cedarcroft Road
Jamaica, New York 11432

Phone: 347-395-4799
Fax: 718-701-3726
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Joseph A. Ledwidge, P.C.